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[UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 1:29 pm
by Dutchgirl
Hi you all ,

In the last 1,5 year I published several book with Createspace. This week I published some books through Ingram.
Since I’m Dutch I always hire an American/Dutch woman to translate/edit my books. She uses the American spelling of course. And takes the American culture into account.

Since Ingram offers to distribute a book in a certain region I was wondering if there are writers who make 2 versions of the same book. One for the US-market and another one for the European/UK market.
In most cases it might not be a problem to distribute the same book in both countries but I know it could be a problem for certain books like recipe books.

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:26 pm
by Phoenix
Normally, of novels and such, it wouldn't matter as the American spelling is universally accepted. That might not be the case for measurements, where Europeans and Australians have been using the metric system for some time now. While conversion of measurements is quite acceptable in cookbooks from the past, I can see that it might be a concern for the modern cookbook. I have seen cookbooks with both imperial and metric weights and temperatures displayed. That is just my opinion though and I am by no means an expert.
Cheers,
Joe.

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:20 am
by David Wake
Phoenix wrote:
Sat Jun 23, 2018 3:26 pm
[...] it wouldn't matter as the American spelling is universally accepted.
What?! What? You're off-centre there, I don't recognise incorrect spelling unless it's for colour to generate a flavour of foreign parts to prove you've travelled. Or for humour. Spelling should be English - the hint's in the name.

As an aside, our indie publishing group has been discussing this: to 'recognize' or 'recognise'. A few of us have started using the 'z' variant and bizarrely it was British English until we needed to show how uneducated these upstart colonials were. We then changed the spelling to prove a point.

I think it makes no difference, so long as you are consistent.

Measurements in a cookbook would be the tricky part. Is it 12, 14 or the number you first thought of ounces to the pound? The British pint is bigger than the American, for example, so I'd suggest sticking to the properly consistent metric system.

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:03 am
by Seisa
David Wake wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:20 am
...so I'd suggest sticking to the properly consistent metric system.
And nearly no American cook would be able to use the book. The imperial measurement system is just as consistent. A liquid cup is always a liquid cup. A tablespoon is always a tablespoon. It's the conversions that are tricky. If you want to publish a cookbook for an international audience, use both measurements so you don't alienate anyone, and you've done the work for them both.

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:20 pm
by walton
Actually, cookbooks with metric measurements is not a big problem. One can get metric measuring devices easily enough. The bigger problem comes in when the actual food items are different. For example, fat content in dairy, gluten content of flour, or any of a gazillion great cheeses that do not meet FDA standards ("In America, by law, all cheese regulated by the FDA (that is, all cheese that is transported across state lines) must either be made from pasteurized (heated) milk or aged at least 60 days.").

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:30 pm
by Phoenix
David Wake wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:20 am
What?! What? You're off-centre there, I don't recognise incorrect spelling unless it's for colour to generate a flavour of foreign parts to prove you've travelled. Or for humour. Spelling should be English - the hint's in the name.
I simply meant that Australians and Europeans in general have had to accept American spelling in their reading habits, as a large majority of popular authors are American, and their books are distributed around the world with the American spelling, as jarring as it can be sometimes. I did not infer that it was okay for anyone else to indulge in their...errant ways. :o

Re: [UK VERSUS US] Language and cultural differences

Posted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 4:31 am
by David Wake
Seisa wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:03 am
The imperial measurement system is just as consistent.
Seriously!? That is indefensible: 2.02667 yards to the fathom, 3 feet to the yard, 4 gills to a pint, 5 fluid ounces to a gill, 7.92 inches to the link, 8 furlongs to the mile, 10 chains to the furlong, 12 inches to the foot, 14 pounds to a stone, etc, etc. One pound is either 12 shillings, 12, 15 or 16 ounces depending on whether you are in the US, London or Troy. Seriously, it's a rod (or 25 links) for your own back. Consider the number of space rockets that have exploded or crashed because of various confusions. I've lived under both imperial and metric systems - there's no contest.

And our pints are bigger than your pints.

The 'cup' was invented (or standardised) for a cookbook (I write in a desperate attempt to get back on topic). Fannie Farmer, the mother of level measurements, came up with the scheme in The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. American.
Phoenix wrote:
Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:30 pm
I did not infer that it was okay for anyone else to indulge in their...errant ways. :o
Some of their ways are kind of cute though.